Tuesday, July 7, 2020

2018 Best Brightest Cece Ukejianya, University of Maryland (Smith)

2018 Best Brightest: Cece Ukejianya, University of Maryland (Smith) by: Jeff Schmitt on April 01, 2018 | 0 Comments Comments 1,028 Views April 1, 2018Cece UkejianyaUniversity of Maryland (Smith)I am a light bulb illuminating myself along with those around me.Fun fact about yourself: I had a video diary in high school, most people just had journals. For my last video I left myself a message to watch at the end of college, I cheated and  watched it after sophomore year and it was good like a  time warp! Very excited to watch it again this summer.Hometown: Baltimore County, MarylandHigh School: Dulaney High SchoolMajor: Accounting and FinanceMinor: No MinorFavorite Business Course: BMGT380 Business LawExtracurricular Activities, Community Work and Leadership Roles During College: Deans Student Advisory Council (DSAC) Council Member; Phi Chi Theta Business Fraternity Sergeant of Arms; Accounting and Business Association President, VP of Membership; Omicron Delta Kappa Leadersh ip Society Vice President, Events Coordinator; Smith Undergrad Student Association New Student Involvement Committee Chair; Womens Empowerment Institute Founder and CEO; Honors Ambassador Student Coordinator; Spirit of Maryland Award Recipient; Philip Merrill Scholar Award Recipient.Where have you interned during your college career? PricewaterHouse Coopers, Baltimore, Internal Revenue Services InternDeloitte, McLean, Rotational InternDeloitte, Los Angeles, Audit InternWhere will you be working after graduation? I will be working for Deloitte in their Los Angeles office as a first year audit staff.Who is your favorite professor? My favorite professor is Progyan Basu (accounting and information assurance) because I can see the joy teaching brings him in everything he does. Ive had the pleasure of seeing the bureaucratic side of academics within a business school. Often, change receives push back from professors because it is difficult to implement. However, â€Å"Basu† has alw ays been willing to continuously better his classes regardless of the difficulty if may bring him. This has allowed his class to seamlessly integrate new teaching techniques to keep his classes modern and engaging.What is the biggest lesson you gained from studying business? There is always more to learn so never stop inquiring.What advice would you give to a student looking to major in a business-related field? Find what you are passionate about and match it with what you’re good at. Business is a part of everything we do. So, for example, if you are great at graphic design and choose to major in marketing but your passionate about non-profits, you can create graphic art for non-profits.â€Å"If I didn’t major in business, I would be majoring in or studying†¦film. I love the world of production and entertainment. My absolute favorite part of this world is watching a story come to life whether in a film based on a book or a music video based on the song. This is why I’m moving to LA to focus my skills in the entertainment industry.What has surprised you most about majoring in business? I didn’t realize how broad the post-graduate opportunities for business students could be. There is so much you can do with business, so many directions you could go in. So when I chose business, it was refreshing to know I wasnt limited in my potential career options.Who most influenced your decision to pursue business in college? My mom connected the dots between my interests as a kid. At the time, I was interested in fashion but I didnt quite like modeling or piecing outfits together. However, I was good at numbers. So she suggested I think about going into the business side of fashion which to me meant marketing. It wasnt until the latter half of high school that I discovered accounting.Which academic, extracurricular or personal achievement are you most proud of? Last semester, I was awarded the Spirit of Maryland Award. This was my proudes t moment because to me it signified that I made a significant impact on my campus. To me, positive meaningful impact is the most valuable outcome of any tasks. However, ones perceived impact can be different from their actual impact and I worried I had perceived a level of impact that was higher than my actual meaningful impact on the campus and the students within it. Thus, the Spirit of Maryland Award served as a needed validation that I do impact others in a positive and significant way.Which classmate do you most admire? Chineme Obiefune is a fellow classmate and dear friend of mine. I admire his ability to lead fearlessly and passionately. One of the hardest aspects of being a leader is doing the right thing even if its unpopular and mobilizing your followers in that direction. As a people pleaser, that is my biggest weakest. Seeing Chineme do it so effortlessly is admirable.Who would you most want to thank for your success? I would thank Jesus first and foremost but my mom is a close second. She worked at two hospitals as an emergency pediatric physician just to send my siblings and I to private school. As a single parent and sole provider, she had to make personal sacrifices so that my siblings and I did not have to. I always admired how selfless she was. Because of this, I started my first job at 16 and applied for my first credit card at 18. It taught me the value of money and how to properly spend it. I also learned how to balance many things at once. All these skills and opportunities would not have been possible without my mom, so she is who I am the most thankful too.What would your theme song be? â€Å"Living out Loud† by Brooke Candy because the song is about living your life the only way you can which is boldly and unapologetically. Although I cannot say that I do that every day all day, it is a goal of mine. That is what makes it my theme song.What are the top two items on your bucket list? Jump out of a plane, visit a natural wonder of the worldFavorite book: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniFavorite movie: Hidden FiguresFavorite vacation spot: Cape Town, South AfricaWhat are your hobbies? Making video montages of trips, dancing (terribly), and watching television.What made Cece such an invaluable addition to the Class of 2018?   Ã¢â‚¬Å"Unbeknownst to many, CeCe joined the Smith family in the summer before her senior year of high school in our inaugural LEAD summer high school business program. Instantly, we knew she would be an unstoppable force in the Smith school and she has proven us right. From QUEST Honors program, President of the Accounting and Business Association, longstanding member of the Dean’s Student Advisory Council, active member in the Smith Undergraduate Student Association, and leader in ODK, Phi Chi Theta Business Fraternity and Theta Nu chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, to name just a few.These accolades pale in comparison to her big heart, infectious la ugh and genuine spirit.  Ã‚  CeCe embodies the extraordinary character, unwavering determination and hard work ethic found in only our top Smith students.While many students entering their final year are busy interviewing for jobs and participating  less  in the campus community, CeCe has been tenaciously working towards the creation of Smith’s newest organization,  Womens Empowerment Institute. Intertwining her passions to see women thrive in the business world, it is clear CeCe has left an indelible legacy for future Smith students as she embarks on her next adventure on the west coast.†Victor C. Mullins, PhD Associate Dean, Undergraduate ProgramDONT MISS: THE BEST BRIGHTEST BUSINESS MAJORS OF 2018 THE COMPLETE LIST Page 1 of 11

Thursday, July 2, 2020

Project Management Methodologies as a Guiding Process - 550 Words

Project Management Methodologies as a Guiding Process for those Pursuing Project Management (Essay Sample) Content: Name:Institution:Course:Date:Instructor:Project Management Methodologies have a guiding process for those pursuing project managementIn the early periods when different business enterprises started looking for ways of simplifying the realization of benefits of businesses and organizing work into a structure and identity, the term methodology got its first definition. The main criterion was collaboration and communication which were used for establishing work relationships between departments and teams. In the framework of project management, methodology provides a planning framework, performance and project delivery of any type, nature, type and size.According to Too and Weaver (3), the framework of project management dwells on realization of change that is desired according to a particular methodological approach. Factually, the fundamental aspect that needs to be effectively managed is change. Management of projects refers to description and performance of activitie s required to meet targeted objectives of implementing and controlling change. For instance, when one writes a book, this is a project that has the objective of writing a book. This particular objective can be achieved through procedural activities like topic definition, material collection, draft creation, typing, proofreading among others.The framework of project management is basically an organized collection of total important tasks required to write a book. To be more profound, it is an organized collection of total important knowledge about how change is made methodologically. An exact algorithm is not described in terms of managing a given project but rather a provision of wide overview of a variety of methods that are different, processes, rules and standards. Based on this, the methodology of project management is a level of the framework of project management. With respect to managing various project types, different methods and approaches can be used in management process .All project methodology types can be divided into modern and traditional approaches. Examples of methodology depend on the type of project, nature and size so as to select correct methodology. Some common methodologies of project management include; even though a complete guide to the body of project management is not a methodology of project management in "pure stateà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ , most people take it as an approach of methodology with respect to executing, planning, controlling as well as terminating different projects (Frames 12).Under controlled environments, PRINCE2 Projects presents a process-driven methods as well as approaches that are documentation-oriented and they allow various projects to be driven in private sectors. The government of UK developed it and nowadays it is widely used in UK and globally. Critical Path Method (CPM) discovers the most vital project tasks by defining activity sequences and estimating extended duration of every sequence. It assists to figure out the duration of time it will consume to finalize the work and the tasks (Collyer 3).The methodology of Lean project management anticipates boosting the value of the customer and minimizing wastage of resources. Lean project management enables enterprises to develop bette...

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Various Models of Consumer Behaviour - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 9 Words: 2767 Downloads: 6 Date added: 2017/06/26 Category Marketing Essay Type Research paper Level High school Did you like this example? Introduction This study uncovered that the field of consumer behaviour represents a broad ranging category where marketers seek to understand individual and group motivations, reactions and responses to varied product and service situations (Solomon et al, 2009). It found the processes and activities undertaken by consumers regarding the stages and steps of the decision and buying process (Gupta et al, 2004). The cognitive approach was found to look at consumer perceptions in processing information that acknowledges social and environmental experiences (Watson and Spence, 2007). Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Various Models of Consumer Behaviour" essay for you Create order Humanistic models delve into behavioural perspectives as opposed to the perception aspects of the cognitive approach. The above summary of the two major consumer categories represented the basis for understanding how they guide the differing models and theories under each. It was ascertained that in terms of cognitive and humanistic, the varied theories and models under them all have special attributes. These represent the basis for the selection of the theory or model suited to individual product or service categories. Cognitive Models Bray (2008) explained that the cognitive approach is credited to Hebbs Stimulus Organism Response model that was introduced in the early 1950s. Hebbs model states that there is a linear relationship concerning the impact of stimuli. This concept has been criticised by Kahle and Close (2006) along with Tyagi and Kumar (2004), who state that the Hebbs model lacks the capacity to account for past experiences as its shortcoming. Bray (2008) explains that people usually respond to the cognitive aspects of their environments, and that these cognitive areas are related to the parameters and processes of learning. He adds that feelings, behaviours and thoughts are connected in a casual manner. Regarding behavioural facets, it emphasises processes connected to human behaviour such as environmental stimuli and their behavioural responses (Zimmerman, 2008). Cognitive Model Consumer Decision Consumer decisions under the cognitive designation consist of three models (Bauer et al, 2006). These represent the utility, satisficing, and prospect theories (Steel and Konig, 2006). The utility theory proposes that people make their decisions based upon expected outcomes (Steel and Konig, 2006). It also views consumers as actors that are rational and able to foresee or estimate the potential outcomes of decisions they make that include the potential for uncertainty. This is a flaw in the utility theory as the unknown end utility functionality of a purchase is debatable at best. Cognitive Model Satisficing Model The satisficing model is a newer alternative to the utility model that was first proposed in the 1700s by Nicholas Bernoulli (Richrme, 2005). It represents larger and longer term consumer decisions. In many cases, good enough is the explanation for this type of decision process (Richrme, 2005). Elements of the utility theory are included in the satisficing model, but since the decision is made less often, consumers tend to accept a different basis for purchase or decision making then those products that are replaced more often (Richrme, 2005). The limitations of funds to purchase exactly what one prefers is a constraint under this consumer behavioural model that in most cases causes consumers to settle as opposed to optimising their decision to meet all of their wants and desires (Bray, 2008). Bray (2008) argues that in many causes the optimal purchase cannot be determined, and that consumers tend to lack the capacity to find the best purchase option. Cognitive Model Prospect Theory The prospect theory was developed in the mid 1970s by Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman (Sirakaya and Woodside, 2005). It added value to replace utility. Value represents a point of reference that consumers can use to determine the gains or losses from a purchase (Camerer et al, 2011). The prospect theory helps to explain aspects of consumer behaviour that are not completely explained under the utility theory. These represent the emotional connection and the potential that the extent of a problem is not fully understood (Sirakaya and Woodside, 2005). These are strengths of the prospect theory over the utility and satisficing theories. Camerer et al (2011) found that the prospect theory might predict outcomes that are not accurate due to the fact it does not consider the characteristics of decision makers regarding their past history, and the context of the decision areas represented by the type of purchase (large versus small ticket items in terms of price or frequency). Cognitive Models Theory of Buyer Behaviour The theory of buyer behaviour represents an approach to analyse and predict the method that consumers use in making their purchase decisions (Pickton and Broderick, 2005). In many cases, a consumer will use a generic decision making model (Pickton and Broderick, 2005). The first step generally represents them conducting research on varied products and prices. In most cases the process is prompted by replacing a product the consumer already owns that has become outdated or no longer works (Calonius, 2006). In order to understand the considerations in the process, the following provides an illustration of the factors: Figure 1 Model of Consumer Buying Considerations Affecting the Buying Process (Friesner, 2014, p. 1) Friesner (2014) adds that understanding consumer buyer behaviour entails how it links to the marketing mix represented by price, place, promotion and product. He advises that marketers and consumers are intertwined as the former modify their approaches to c reate a climate for consumer action, and that that the reaction of consumers causes continued modifications to the 4Ps. The above explains the strength and weakness of buying behaviour as it is based on the parameters of past and current consumer motivations, and actions. This same strength also represents a weakness as new products; better information availability (such as the Internet) and shifting product reputations mean that buying behaviour patterns and rationales are consistently changing (Calonius, 2006). Cognitive Models Theory of Reasoned Action The theory of reasoned action is a method to predict behaviour, attitude and intention (Cooke and French, 2006). It separates intention from behavioural aspects that provide the framework to explain the impact of attitude (Hale et al, 2002). The main tenets are based on attitude, behavioural intention and subjective norm (Cooke and French, 2006). Attitude represents the beliefs formed by a consumer concerning a behavioural approach that include the assessment of what the consequences might be. Behavioural intention looks at the strength of an individuals intention in performing a behaviour, with the subjective norm representing perceived expectations based on other people or groups, and how a person measures up to these norms (Cooke and French, 2006). The weakness of reasoned action is that the sum of the comparison group forms the basis for measurement. If the intentions, subjective norms or attitude are improperly gathered, it negatively affects the outcome. Cognitive Models Theory of Planned Behaviour The theory of planned behaviour connects behaviour and beliefs (Ajzen, 2011). It is an improvement on the theory of reasoned action as it adds perceived behavioural control to attitude, behavioural intention and subjective norm (Ajzen, 2011). The addition of perceived behavioural control looks into the perceptions individuals carry regarding their capability to perform a type of behaviour (Kraft et al, 2005). This is the strength of the theory as it delves into the potential presence of factors that may impede or aid behaviour performance. Conversely, it also represents a weakness because if the perception does not accurately reflect actual behavioural control, it can cause incorrect conclusions or assumptions (Kraft et al, 2005). Humanistic Models Humanistic models of consumer behaviour are close to the behavioural perspective with some key differences (Wong, 2006). It is defined by Davis and Palladino (2010) as focusing on areas that can be observed and emphasises the learned nature of such behaviours. The humanistic model places emphasis on the individual and their psychodynamic determinants that consist of behaviours that can be observed and their reaction to external stimuli (Wong, 2006). Humanistic models also take into account the psychology represented by Maslows hierarchy of needs that observed people tend to be motivated by rewards or unconscious desires (Koltko-Rivera, 2006). Figure 2 Maslows Hierarchy of Needs (Burton, 2012, p. 1) Maslow refers to the four bottom tiers as representing deficiency needs (Anderson, 2014). He explains that individuals become anxious when these needs are not met or if they are under threat. The top tier represents growth as it permits individuals to employ self-actuali sation that include independence, objectivity, awareness, creativity and honesty (Anderson, 2014). Bourdieu (Trigg, 2004) along with Rouse (2004) and others have criticised Maslows hierarchy of needs as being too schematic (meaning too planned or structured) and as lacking in scientific principles. Others such as Oleson (2004) and Dye et al (2005) state it provides a useful theory and intuitive guide to understand aspects of human motivation. The humanistic approach and its models represent that people have the capacity to guide and shape their destiny and thinking to design courses of action they can follow or amend as circumstances or situations change (Davis and Palladino, 2010). Humanistic Models Theory of Trying The theory of trying represents a consumer seeking to act on a particular thought or series of thoughts connected to a potential purchase (Ahuja and Thatcher, 2005). Carsrud et al (2009, p. 155) explain it as an attitude toward a reasoned action is replaced by an attitude toward trying and an intention is restricted to an intention to try. The theory integrates hierarchical goals into a behavioural context that people use to work toward a decision (Ahuja and Thatcher, 2005). It delves into the processes individuals work through in attempting to solve a selection problem that includes looking at the varied options that are available. Figure 3 The Theory of Trying (Bray, 2008, p. 27) As shown by the above, the stages contributing to the theory channel into intention to try before being considered or actualised. The issue with the theory is that it represents a subjective process that seeks to identify a switch in consumer intention from attitude to trying (Ahuja and Thatcher, 2005). This entails opinions based on the recorded intentions or attitudes of individuals that might have been perceived incorrectly. The other aspect that represents a weakness is that it is skewed toward the evaluation of the potential consumption patterns of individuals as opposed to their buying behaviour (Ahuja and Thatcher, 2005). Humanistic Models Model of Goal Directed Behaviour The model of goal-directed behaviour was build on the tenets of the theory of planned behaviour as it advances the aspect of goals as its main foundation rather than behaviours (Hagger and Chatzisarantis, 2007). Desire is a critical component as its represents a driving force: Figure 4 Model of Goal Directed Behaviour (Bray, 2008, p. 28) The model of goal-directed behaviour is complex due to attitude, positive and negative anticipated emotions and subjective norms contributing to desires. As shown in the above figure, desire is a critical component that also represents a potential source of misunderstanding as it is a subjective area that can easily be misconstrued concerning consumer behaviour. Conclusion This exploration of cognitive and humanistic models uncovered that the varied theories and approaches under each has their own unique attributes. It was also found that each tends to have specific attributes that fit varied situations or circumstances based on what marketers are seeking to uncover to utilise in the development of campaigns and approaches to generating sales. The cognitive approach seeks to uncover experiences, feelings, values, expectations and thoughts consumers develop and use as a part of their decision, and reasons for action. The three approaches under consumer decision making primarily represent rational (utility), expectations (satisficing) and value (prospect) approaches. The theory of buyer behaviour is a complex process that is influenced by marketing (the 4Ps), along with purchase considerations and psychological aspects that include perception and learning. The deeper a marketer elects to explore the above leads to using the theory of reasoned action that seeks to separate intention from behavioural aspects. This can thus be used to delve into the theory of planned behaviour that adds attitude and perceived behavioural aspects. Whilst the humanistic models concerning consumer behaviour have a close affinity to behavioural perspectives, they place more emphasis on psychodynamic aspects and individuals using phenomenon that is observable and learned from such behaviours. Maslows hierarchy of needs explained that the self actualisation phase as the top tier was applicable under the humanistic approach as it represents the stage where base needs no longer control decisions. The theory of trying demonstrates the above as it represents a consumer seeking to act on a particular thought as the means to decide on a selection using hierarchical goals. Goal directed behaviour is more personally motivated as it utilises desires as a core component in the process. It was found that each of the theories and models examined under cognit ive and humanistic approaches had their strengths and shortcomings. This is because each of these models are based on differing approaches such as uncovering experiences, feelings, values, expectations and thoughts under cognitive, compared to psychodynamic and individuals observable phenomenon for humanistic. This study brought out that no one model or theory adequately explores or explains consumer decision making or behaviour, but that through combinations, marketers can arrive at more comprehensive understandings. References Ahuja, M., Thatcher, J. (2005) Moving beyond intentions and toward the theory of trying: effects of work environment and gender on post-adoption information technology use. MIS Quarterly. 29(3). pp. 433-437. Ajzen, I. (2011) The theory of planned behaviour: Reactions and reflections. Psychology and Health. 26(9). pp. 1115-1116. Anderson, A. (2014) Maslows Hierarchy of Needs. The Prairie Light Review. 36(2). pp. 4-6. Bauer, H., Sauer, N., Becker, C. (2006) Investigating the relationship between product involvement and consumer decision-making styles. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. 5(4). pp. 348-351. Bray, J. (2008) Consumer Behaviour Theory: Approaches and Models. (online) Available at https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/10107/1/Consumer_Behaviour_Theory_-_Approaches_%26_Models.pdf Burton, N. (2012) Our Hierarchy of Needs. (online) Available at https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201205/our-hierarchy-needs Calonius, H. (2006) Contemporary Research in M arketing: A Market Behaviour Framework. (online) Available at https://www.udec.edu.mx/BibliotecaInvestigacion/Documentos/2009/Febrero/Mercadotecnia%20investigaci%C3%B3n%20contempor%C3%A1nea.pdf Camerer, C., Loewenstein, G., Rabin, M. (2011) Advances in Behavioral Economics. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Carsrud, A., Brannback, M., Elfving, J. amp; Brandt, K. (2009) Motivations: The Entrepreneurial Mind and Behaviour. In Carsrud, A. amp; Brannback, M. Understanding the Entrepreneurial Mind: Opening the Black Box. New YorkSpringer Publications. Cooke, R., French, D. (2006) How well do the theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behaviour predict intentions and attendance at screening programmes? A meta-analysis. Psychology and Health. 23(7). pp. 751-754. Davis, S., Palladino, J. (2010) Psychology. New York: Pearson Education. Dye, K., Mills, A., Weatherbee, T. (2005) Maslow: man interrupted: reading management theory in context. Management Decision. 43( 10). pp.1385 1393. Friesner, T. (2014) Consumer Buyer Behaviour. (online) Available at https://www.marketingteacher.com/consumer-buyer-behaviour/ Gupta, A., Su, B., Walter, Z. (2004) An Empirical Study of Consumer Switching from Traditional to Electronic Channels: A Purchase-Decision Process Perspective. International Journal of Electronic Commerce. 8(3). pp. 134-137. Hagger, M. amp; Chatzisarantis, N. (2007) Social Psychology of Exercise and Sport. London: McGraw-Hill International. Hale, J., Householder, B., Greene, K. (2002) The theory of reasoned action. In Dillard, J., Pfau, M. The persuasion handbook: Developments in theory and practice. Thousand Oaks Sage Publications. Kahle, L., Close, A. (2006) Consumer Behaviour Knowledge for Effective Sports and Event Marketing. New York: Taylor and Francis. Koltko-Rivera, M. (2006) Rediscovering the later version of Maslows hierarchy of needs: Self-transcendence and opportunities for theory, research, and unification. Review of General Psychology. 10(4). pp. 308-311. Kraft, P., Rise, J., Sutton, S., Raysamb, E. (2005) Perceived difficulty in the theory of planned behaviour: Perceived behavioural control or affective attitude? British Journal of Social Psychology. 44(3). pp. 481-484. Oleson, M. (2004) Exploring the relationship between money attitudes and Maslows hierarchy of needs. International Journal of Consumer Studies. 28(1). pp. 81-82. Pickton, D., Broderick, A. (2005) Integrated Marketing Communications. London: Prentice Hall. Richrme, M. (2005) Consumer Decision-Making Models, Strategies, and Theories, Oh My! (online) Available at https://www.bj.decisionanalyst.com/Downloads/ConsumerDecisionMaking.pdf Rouse, K. (2004) Beyond Maslows hierarchy of needs what do people strive for? Performance Improvement. 43(10). pp. 27-31. Sirakaya, E., Woodside, A. (2005) Building and testing theories of decision making by travellers. Tourism Management. 26(6). pp. 819-821. Solomon, M. , Zaichlowsky, J., Polegato, R. (2009) Consumer Behaviour: Buying, Having, and Being. New York: Prentice Hall. Steel, P., Konig, C. (2006) Integrating Theories of Motivation. Academy of Management Review. 31(4). pp. 851-857. Trigg, A. (2004) Deriving the Engel Curve: Pierre Bourdieu and the Social Critique of Maslows Hierarchy of Needs. Review of Social Economy. 62(3) pp. 395-397. Tyagi, C., Kumar, A. (2004) Consumer Behaviour. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers Watson, L., Spence, M. (2007) Causes and consequences of emotions on consumer behaviour: A review and integrative cognitive appraisal theory. European Journal of Marketing. 41(6). pp.497 501. Wong, P. (2006) Existential and Humanistic Theories. In Jay, T., Segal, D., Hersen, M. Comprehensive Handbook of Personality and Psychopathology: Personality and Everyday Functioning. Hoboken: John Wiley amp; Sons Inc. Zimmerman, B. (2008) Investigating Self-Regulation and Motivation: Historical Background, Methodological Developments, and Future Prospects. American Educational Research Journal. 45(1) pp. 171-175.

James Patterson Book List by Year

Author  James Patterson releases several books every year, thrilling his fans with page-turners that are easy to read and entertaining. Many of his books are co-written with lesser-known authors, allowing him to write more than one man could on his own. Wondering if you have missed one of his releases? Complete List Of James Patterson Books By Year 1976 - The Thomas Berryman Number1977 - Season of the Machete1977 - The Jericho Commandment (published again in 1997 as See How They Run)1980 - Virgin1986 - Black Market (published again in 2000 as Black Friday)1988 - The Midnight Club1992 - Along Came A Spider (Alex Cross Series)1994 - Kiss the Girls (Alex Cross Series)1996 - Jack Jill (Alex Cross Series)1996 - Hide Seek1996 - Miracle on the 17th Green (with Peter De Jonge)1997 - See How They Run (published previously as The Jericho Commandment)1997 - Cat and Mouse (Alex Cross Series)1998 - When the Wind Blows1999 - Pop Goes the Weasel (Alex Cross Series)2000 - Black Friday (previously published in 1986 as Black Market)2000 - Cradle All (previously published in 1980 as Virgin)2000 - Roses are Red (Alex Cross Series)2001 - Violets are Blue (Alex Cross Series)2001 - Suzannes Diary for Nicholas2001 - 1st to Die (Womens Murder Club)2002 - Four Blind Mice (Alex Cross Series)2002 - Beach House(with Peter De Jonge)2002 - 2nd Chance (Wom ens Murder Club, with Andrew Gross)2003 - The Big Bad Wolf (Alex Cross Series)2003 - The Jester(with Andrew Gross)2003 - The Lake House (sequel to When The Wind Blows)2004 - 3rd Degree (Womens Murder Club, with Andrew Gross)2004 - London Bridges (Alex Cross Series)2004 - Sams Letters to Jennifer2004 - Santa Kid2005 - 4th of July (Womens Murder Club, with Maxine Paetro)2005 - Mary, Mary (Alex Cross Series)2005 - Honeymoon(with Howard Roughan)2005 - Lifeguard(with Andrew Gross)2005 - Maximum Ride: The Angel Experiment2006 - Cross(Alex Cross Series)2006 - (with Peter De Jonge)2006 - Judge and Jury(with Andrew Gross)2006 - 5th Horseman (Womens Murder Club, with Maxine Paetro)2007 - Step on a Crack2007 - 6th Target  (Womens Murder Club Series)2007 - Double Cross  (Alex Cross Series)2008 - 7th Heaven  (Womens Murder Club Series)2008 - Maximum Ride #4: The Final Warning2008 - Sundays at Tiffanys2008 - Sail2008 - The Dangerous Days of Daniel X2008 - Against Medical Advice2008 - Cross Country  (Alex Cross Series)2009 - The 8th Confession  (Womens Murder Club Series)2009 - Daniel X: Watch the Skies2009 - The Murder of King Tut2009 - Witch Wizard2009 - Alex Cross Trial  (Alex Cross Series)2009 - I, Alex Cross  (Alex Cross Series)2010 - Worst Case2010 - Fang2010 - The 9th Judgment  (Womens Murder Club Series)2010 - Dont Blink2010 - Private2010 - Postcard Killers2010 - Cross Fire  (Alex Cross Series)2010 - Witch Wizard: The Gift2011 - Tick Tock2011 - Angel2011 - Toys2011 -  Kill Alex Cross  (Alex Cross Series)2012 -  10th Anniversary  (Womens Murder Club Series)2012 - Private Games2012 - Private: #1 Suspect2012 - Guilty Wives2012 - 11th Hour  (Womens Murder Club Series)2012 - Middle School: Get Me Out of Here2012 - I, Michael Bennett2012 - Nevermore: The Final Maximum Ride Adventure2012 - Zoo2012 - Confessions of a Murder Suspect2012 - NYPD Red2012 - Daniel X: Armageddon2012 - Merry Christmas, Alex Cross  (Alex Cross Series)2012 - I, Funny20 13 - Private Berlin2013 - Witch Wizard: The Kiss2013 - Alex Cross, Run  (Alex Cross Series)2013 - Middle School: My Brother Is a Big, Fat Liar2013 - 12th of Never  (Womens Murder Club Series)2013 - Second Honeymoon2013 - Private Down Under2013 - Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill2013 - Mistress2013 - Treasure Hunters2013 - Gone2013 - Confessions: The Private School Murders2013 - Cross My Heart  (Alex Cross Series)2013 - I Even Funnier2014 - First Love 2014 - Private L.A.2014 - NYPD Red 22014 - Middle School: Ultimate Showdown2014 - Unlucky 13  (Womens Murder Club Series)2014 - Invisible2014 - Middle School: Save Rafe2014 - Homeroom Diaries2014 - Private Down Under2014 - Danger Down The Nile2014 - Burn2014 - Confessions: The Paris Mysteries2014 - Private India2014 - Hope to Die  (Alex Cross Series)2014 - House of Robots2014 - The Lost2015 - Private Vegas2015 - I Totally Funniest2015 - NYPD Red 32015 - Public School Superhero2015 - The Mystery W riters of America Cookbook2015 - 14th Deadly Sin  (Womens Murder Club Series)2015 - Maximum Ride Forever2015 - Truth or Die2015 - Just My Rotten Luck2015 - Lights Out2015 - Alert2015 - Private Syndey2015 - Secret of the Forbidden City2015 - The Murder House2015 - Confessions: The Murder of an Angel2015 - Cross Justice  (Alex Cross Series)2015 - Robots Go Wild!2015 - I Funny TV2016 - NYPD Red 42016 - Private Paris2016 - Jacky Ha-Ha2016 - 15th Affair  (Womens Murder Club Series)2016 - Ultimate Fight2016 - Private Rio2016 - Filthy Rich2016 - Humans, Bow Down2016 - Peril at the Top of the World2016 - Bullseye2016 - Woman of God2016 - From Hero to Zero2016 - Cross the Line  (Alex Cross Series)2017 - Middle School: Escape to Australia2017 - The Shut-In2017 - The End: An Owen Taylor Story2017 - Bedding the Highlander2017 - The Black Book2017 - I Funny: School of Laughs2017 - Night Sniper2017 - After the End: An Owen Taylor Story2017 - Two from the Heart2017 - How to Be a Supervilla in2017 - 16th Seduction (Womens Murder Club Series)2017 - Crazy House2017 - Juror #32017 - The Dolls2017 - Dr. Death2017 - Big Words for Little Geniuses

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The French Revolution - 1460 Words

The initial impulse of the French revolution was destructive. For those who lived through all, or even part, of these vast upheavals, the shock was overwhelming. Maximilien Robespierre was a proud disciple of the enlightenment and declared that no political writer had foreseen this revolution. Robespierre (1758-1794) was one of the leaders of the Committee of Public Safety, the effective governing body of France during the most radical phase of the revolution. The leaders of this revolution attempted, perhaps more than any other revolutionary leaders before or since, to totally transform human society in every way. (Supreme Being) Although Robespierre began with patriotic intent he still was the face of the Reign of Terror and was viewed as being a radical person. On February 5,1794 Robespierre wrote a speech justifying the use of terror in the French government. He talks about how if people themselves are corrupted then liberty is lost and you might as well start over. Robespierre would stop at nothing to get rid of anyone who opposed the revolution. â€Å"it rallies all vicious men against us, all those who in their hearts contemplated despoiling the people and all those who intend to let it be despoiled with impunity, both those who have rejected freedom as a personal calamity and those who have embraced the revolution as a career and the Republic as prey.† (Use of Terror) He is saying that the anti revolutionists rally all these angry men together and try to hurt France asShow MoreRelatedThe French Revolution And French Revolutions2006 Words   |  9 PagesAlthough the American and French revolutions both took place in the late 18th century, both fought for independence, and both portrayed patriotism, the revolutions are markedly different in their origins; one which led to the world’s longest lasting democracy and the other to a Napoleonic Dictatorship. Political revolutions in America and France happened because people felt dissatisfied with the way their country was run. In North America they rebelled against rule from a foreign power, they wantedRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1523 Words   |  7 PagesThe French Revolution was a time rife with violence, with many revolutionaries using extreme actions to overturn the French Monarchy and create a government based on equality and justice, rather than tyranny and despotism. This violence reached gruesome and terrible heights throughout the revolution, but was justified by the revolutionaries, who believed that their goals of total equality, the end of tyranny, and the return to a virtuous society, allowed them to use means necessary to attain theseRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1321 Words   |  6 Pages The French Revolution The French Revolution was an iconic piece of history that help shape the world. It was a time were great battles occurred. Blood sheds happen almost every day. The streets were red by the blood of bodies that were dragged from being beheaded. The economy was in bad shape. But before all of this the French had a few goals but there was one goal that they all wanted and that was to get rid of the monarchy. This idea did not arrive out of nowhere, the commoners were influenceRead MoreThe Revolution Of The French Revolution1040 Words   |  5 PagesWhile there were political and social causes of The French Revolution the most important cause was actually economic. A few years before the French’s revolution the French spent approximately 1.3 billion livres, 13 billion dollars, on the American Revolution. This gracious contribution caused trouble at home. The French Revolution was one of the most important events in history. While it changed the social structure in France it also affected many different countries across the world. â€Å"the treeRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1640 Words   |  7 Pages The French Revolution is often seen as one of the most influential and significant events in world history (Voices 9). The surge of rebellion present in those against the old regime, or Ancien Rà ©gime, inspired reformers for generations to come. Nevertheless, the French Revolution would not have occurred without the aid of the Enlightenment Thinkers, or Philosophà ©s. These Philosophà ©s’ ideas sparked the French Revolution. Prior to the French Revolution, France was radically different. It was theRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1336 Words   |  6 PagesAnalysis The French Revolution was such an important time history. Not only was it a massacre with many lives being lost, including that of Queen Marie Antoinette and her husband King Louis XVI, it was also a time of great political turmoil which would turn man against man that being the case of Edmond Burke and Thomas Paine. Edmond Burke a traditionalist who believed the people should be loyal to the king against his former friend, Thomas Paine a free thinker who believed in order for things toRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1223 Words   |  5 Pages French Revolution As the Enlightenment began in the middle of the 17th century, people began to use reason rather than stick to tradition. New Enlightenment ideas spread throughout Europe such as ideas on government. Enlightenment thinkers such as Rousenan believed that the best government was one formed with the general consent of the people. Other Enlightenment thinkers such as Voltaire and Montesquieu believed in freedom of speech and a separation of power within the government. All of theseRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1221 Words   |  5 PagesWhen people think of the French Revolution, they immediately think of the country of France and how the Revolution affected it. What most people do not think about however, is how the Revolution affected other countries, specifically the country of England. England was affected positively and negatively by the Revolution in that there was an increase of political involvement, but there was a collapse in the economy due to war declared by France. The French Revolution created a battle of conflictingRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1180 Words   |  5 PagesLooking at the historical timeline, one can see that the French Revolution derived after the Enlightenment, which brought different ways of thinking, and different outlooks on government and society (553),(555),(558). The Enlightenment also changed the world of public debate, and established some ideas central to the French Revolution. The French Revolution of 1789 occurred due to government debt, class conflict, bankruptcy, the Enlightenment, and the rule of absolutism. These social, economic, andRead MoreThe French Revolution And The Revolution1305 Words   |  6 Pages The French Revolution (1789-1814) was a period that affected the outcome of world history tremendously. This is considered a major turning point in European history which has led to dramatic changes in France and other regions of the world. Various social and political issues led to the start of the revolution. Politically, France suffered under the rule of Louis XVI, who ruled by absolute monarchy. Many people had their natural rights renounced and weren’t able to have a political voice. Socially

Juvenile Homicide Can Be Prevented Essay - 2162 Words

Introduction For every 12 homicides committed in the United States 1 of them involves a juvenile offender (Howard N. Snyder, Juvenile Offenders and Victims, 2006). Although most American don’t realize it, juvenile homicide is a problem in the United States that needs to be fixed. Even though statistics show that the homicide rate done by juveniles is at its lowest rate since the early 1980’s it is still a problem. Juvenile homicide has lowered in the recent years, but the fact that it still happens is chilling to most Americans. Most Americans believe that juveniles who show early signs of deviant acts are not a big deal, however if we try and help those juveniles, we can possibly stop them from committing homicidal acts when they get†¦show more content†¦In the recent years many criminologists have used three different demographics used to describe juvenile homicide offenders. Those are: juvenile gang members, between 15-17 years in age, and mostly males (Dire ctorate, 2002). They are often gang members; when gangs recruit members to join their gang they will often target the young, because they can mold them to believe that the gang is the main thing in their life. If they get in the gang they are more likely to begin to carry guns, and deal drugs compared to juveniles who are not gang members. In data gathered from interviews of arrested juveniles in the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) study, The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention states that juvenile gang members are reasonably more likely to carry a gun on a day to day basis compared to the juveniles which are not involved in gangs (31% percent compared to 20%) (James C. Howell, 1999). With saying that, James C. Howell, and Scott R. Decker found that the juvenile homicide problem in St. Louis was mainly â€Å"largely a gun homicide problem† (James C. Howell, 1999). The average age of a juvenile homicide offender is in their upper teens. According to The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention from 2006 and 2008, 90% of the juvenile homicide offenders were 15-17 years old, compared to only 10% were 6-14 years old. High SchoolShow MoreRelatedJuvenile Delinquency And Its Effects On The Development Of An Individual s Brain1269 Words   |  6 Pagesfamilies are often a part of the background of juvenile homicide offenders. While not the case for all, juveniles convicted of homicide more frequently have criminally violent family members (Darby, Allan, Kashani, Hartke, Reid, 1998) in addition to parental absence. Compared to nonviolent youths, juvenile homicide offenders are twice as likely to have suffered physical abuse at the hands of family members (Darby et al., 1998). When juveniles experience abuse and neglect, they are at riskRead MoreJuvenile Homicide: A Search for Acceptance901 Words   |  4 Pagessubjects, especially wh en the youth are involved. The subject is even touchier when both the murderers and those murdered are children themselves. Juvenile homicide is rarely defined as anything other than a horrific, illegal behavior performed by children or adolescents. It is simply seen as a criminal act. I think it is much more than that. Juvenile homicide in essence, is a search for acceptance. Kids will change friends, clothes, music, hobbies, pretty much their entire lifestyles as in effort toRead MoreBalancing Justice and Rehabilitation Essay538 Words   |  3 Pageson track, the multistep juvenile justice system determines adolescent offenders’ consequences to provide them a chance for change and rehabilitation, making it overall effective and fair to juveniles and the community. Although most juveniles who enter the system are not real criminals, some are, so by understanding their crimes and reasoning, law enforcement can better identify and stop repeat offenders. For instance, most crime rates have gone down recently, but juvenile robbery arrests have increasedRead More No Prison Time for Juvenile Crime and Violence Essay882 Words   |  4 Pages No Prison Time for Juvenile Crime nbsp; Students are shooting up schools across the country. Kids as young as twelve and thirteen are being convicted of murdering their peers. Right here in Hanover, two teens have been charged with the murders of Dartmouth professors. Although juvenile crime across the country may not be on the rise, high publicity, headline-grabbing juvenile-perpetrated homicides certainly are. nbsp; Prosecutors, attempting to satiate public demand for justice, haveRead MorePunishing Criminals by Death Will Deter Future Crimes...or Not?1216 Words   |  5 Pagesessay gives an example of Canada. How crime was not deterred by the imposition of death penalty as a tool used by the system of justice. The essay states some of the research that has been conducted with the intention of proving that capital punishment can deter crimes. This paper points out the effects and imposition of capital punishments on criminal activities. The paper finally makes a conclusion on the issue of capital punishment as deterrence. Introduction Many people assume that punishmentRead MoreOperation Ceasefire : A Problem Oriented Policing Intervention1701 Words   |  7 PagesAbstract Operation Ceasefire is a problem-oriented policing intervention aimed at reducing youth homicide and youth firearms violence in Boston. Project design began in 1995 and it was implemented in 1996. It is based on the â€Å"pulling levers† deterrence strategy that focuses criminal justice attention on a small number of chronically offending gang-involved youth responsible for much of Boston’s youth homicide problem. This paper will explore the problem Operation Ceasefire is trying to solve and examineRead MoreU.s. Gun Legislation On The Rights Of A Free State1253 Words   |  6 PagesOwner s Protection Act is approved by Congress. The law prohibits felons from owning or possessing guns or ammunition. The Law Enforcement Officers Protection Act is also passed. It prohibits the manufacturing, importing and selling of ammunition that can penetrate a bulletproof vest. 1993: Congress passes the The Brady Handgun Violence Act, establishing the National Instant Criminal Backgr ound Check System gun dealers are to use before selling a gun. The law is named after former White House Press SecretaryRead MoreDeterminate Sentencing: Last Chance in Texas Essay1325 Words   |  6 Pagesbecoming more popular in juvenile courts. It is a special statute that allows for the possibility of a juvenile serving a sentence beyond the age of 21. It specifically covers certain violent offenses and drug cases, like murder, capital murder, sexual assault, and indecency with a child. Aggravated controlled substances cases are also covered (TYC website). The alternative to determinate sentencing is blended sentencing, which allows judges to issue delinquent offenders both juvenile and adult dispositionsRead MoreCapital Punishment And The Death Penalty946 Words   |  4 Pagesconvicted criminal is executed varies from state to state. I do not believe that the death penalty is justifiable in almost any instance, if any. Throughout this class, I have read and experienced confusi on on my opinion of whether capital punishment can be justifiable. If there was an absolute 100% belief and proof of guilt for the most serious of crimes (murder. rape, etc.), I would agree with the punishment of death. However, this is not the case most of the time. Research indicates that roughlyRead MoreSchools Should Not Be A Safe Haven862 Words   |  4 Pagesmany students when their day at school begins so does their nightmare. Since school-aged children are already filled with anxiety, emotions, and hormones when you add any type of negative experiences such as, rejection, violence or being picked on you can quickly have a recipe for delinquent behavior. It is terrifying to think that one day your child is sent off to school and that is the day one of their peers decides to carry out an act of violence. Schools are dangerous, but not in the way we imagine

Cold Blood free essay sample

Truman Capote (1965) gives his own narrative of the Holcomb tragedy in which a family of four living out on a secluded farm were slaughtered with a shotgun by the collaboration of two individuals for a seemingly few dollars. In this novel, Capote gives a thorough character description of the two murderers, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, as he recreates their experience (much as he sees it as it would be from their eyes). He gives accounts preceding the event, through it, and eventually into their trial and execution. From the descriptions Capote provides, a psychological analysis of the mental states of Hickock and Smith can be asserted. Richard Hickock can be seen as possessing significant traits of psychopathy, while his partner Perry Smith is seen with traits similar to that of a life-course persistent offender. Through the described personality characteristics and brief histories of Hickock and Smith, this essay will address this assertion with the two in question as individuals themselves, within their relationship to each other, and also as other characters see and analyze their psychological well being. The reader gets to â€Å"know† Perry Smith very well throughout the novel and acquires the sense that Capote feels sympathetic to his situation as compared to that of Hickock. Smith, introduced as much the loner type, is described by the narrator and the character Smith himself (in a letter to a psychiatrist) as growing up in a low socio-economic bracket with a broken family accompanied by a lack of love and stability characterizing his childhood (and continuing on to adulthood in which is the state of which the book Read Full Essay In the non-fiction novel In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965) gives his own narrative of the Holcomb tragedy in which a family of four living out on a secluded farm were slaughtered with a shotgun by the collaboration of two individuals for a seemingly few dollars. In this novel, Capote gives a thorough character description of the two murderers, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, as he recreates their experience (much as he sees it as it would be from their eyes). He gives accounts preceding the event, through it, and eventually into their trial and execution. From the descriptions Capote provides, a psychological analysis of the mental states of Hickock and Smith can be asserted. Richard Hickock can be seen as possessing significant traits of psychopathy, while his partner Perry Smith is seen with traits similar to that of a life-course persistent offender. Through the described personality characteristics and brief histories of Hickock and Smith, this essay will address this assertion with the two in question as individuals themselves, within their relationship to each other, and also as other characters see and analyze their psychological well being. The reader gets to â€Å"know† Perry Smith very well throughout the novel and acquires the sense that Capote feels sympathetic to his situation as compared to that of Hickock. Smith, introduced as much the loner type, is described by the narrator and the character Smith himself (in a letter to a psychiatrist) as growing up in a low socio-economic bracket with a broken family accompanied by a lack of love and stability characterizing his childhood (and continuing on to adulthood in which is the state of which the book Read Full Essay In the non-fiction novel In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965) gives his own narrative of the Holcomb tragedy in which a family of four living out on a secluded farm were slaughtered with a shotgun by the collaboration of two individuals for a seemingly few dollars. In this novel, Capote gives a thorough character description of the two murderers, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, as he recreates their experience (much as he sees it as it would be from their eyes). He gives accounts preceding the event, through it, and eventually into their trial and execution. From the descriptions Capote provides, a psychological analysis of the mental states of Hickock and Smith can be asserted. Richard Hickock can be seen as possessing significant traits of psychopathy, while his partner Perry Smith is seen with traits similar to that of a life-course persistent offender. Through the described personality characteristics and brief histories of Hickock and Smith, this essay will address this assertion with the two in question as individuals themselves, within their relationship to each other, and also as other characters see and analyze their psychological well being. The reader gets to â€Å"know† Perry Smith very well throughout the novel and acquires the sense that Capote feels sympathetic to his situation as compared to that of Hickock. Smith, introduced as much the loner type, is described by the narrator and the character Smith himself (in a letter to a psychiatrist) as growing up in a low socio-economic bracket with a broken family accompanied by a lack of love and stability characterizing his childhood (and continuing on to adulthood in which is the state of which the book Read Full Essay In the non-fiction novel In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965) gives his own narrative of the Holcomb tragedy in which a family of four living out on a secluded farm were slaughtered with a shotgun by the collaboration of two individuals for a seemingly few dollars. In this novel, Capote gives a thorough character description of the two murderers, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith, as he recreates their experience (much as he sees it as it would be from their eyes). He gives accounts preceding the event, through it, and eventually into their trial and execution. From the descriptions Capote provides, a psychological analysis of the mental states of Hickock and Smith can be asserted. Richard Hickock can be seen as possessing significant traits of psychopathy, while his partner Perry Smith is seen with traits similar to that of a life-course persistent offender. Through the described personality characteristics and brief histories of Hickock and Smith, this essay will address this assertion with the two in question as individuals themselves, within their relationship to each other, and also as other characters see and analyze their psychological well being. The reader gets to â€Å"know† Perry Smith very well throughout the novel and acquires the sense that Capote feels sympathetic to his situation as compared to that of Hickock. Smith, introduced as much the loner type, is described by the narrator and the character Smith himself (in a letter to a psychiatrist) as growing up in a low socio-economic bracket with a broken family accompanied by a lack of love and stability characterizing his childhood (and continuing on to adulthood in which is the state of which the book Read Full Essay